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Thursday, November 1, 2012

A Story With A Slower Start: What Do You Think? G!veaway, Erotic Romance


 
Alex’s Angel is different from my other published stories. It has a slower start. Part of the reason for this is that the heroine and hero are introduced before they meet each other. I wanted readers to know Emily and her motivation for getting her book published. I felt it was important to know for the reader to be able to understand her actions and beliefs. She really believes her art and her book could save the mariners who were being held in captivity in Algeria.


There is an additional reason for a slower start. Alex is not sexually or romantically attracted to Emily when he first sees her. She’s just not his type. She’s too young, too thin. She is not a classic beauty. She is not elegant or sophisticated. These are all the things that Alex values in his women.
 

But she is very intense, willful and passionate about her beliefs. It is her force of personality that holds his attention and makes it hard for him to simply turn away from her.
 

I could have started the story right before he begins to feel attracted to her but I wanted the reader to know their story from the very first moment he set eyes on her. I felt something would have been lost without this.

 


What do you think about stories with a slower start and a little wait before the fireworks begin?
 

Alex's Angel is the story of an idealistic nineteen year old crusader. She uses her artist's vision and skills to write a book that she believes will change the hearts of a nation. She knows her book will save the lives of American mariners held for years forgotten in barbaric captivity in Algeria. She will do anything to see her book in print.



However, she has no idea that the issue of the Barbary Captives is rife with political implications. There are reasons why printers won't publish her book. After repeated rejections, she knows she needs a benefactor, someone who will pay the cost of getting her book printed.
In the course of her mission, she meets handsome and charming yet enigmatic Alexander Dalton, the second most wealthy gentleman in Federalist Philadelphia. His carnal appeal and financial power over her threatens to knock her off her determined course. Will his dark secrets engulf her and extinguish her inner light. Or can she find a way to love and believe in a flawed man and yet still be true to her cause?

By the way, even though there is a lot of history in this story, it is still very much an erotic romance. Night Owl Reviews described it as "Very erotic with the blistering chemistry..." It does not follow a traditional romance plot. The heroine is unconventional.





If you’d like to read the prologue and first chapter AND enter to win a free e-copy of Alex’s Angel, please click the banner below:




 

10 comments:

  1. Slower starts are OK as long as they're well written. Sometimes, in a slow start, there's too much detail; too much exposition. That really can lose my interest.
    catherinelee100 at gmail dot com

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    1. Thank you, Catherine, for sharing your view.

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  2. Well, at risk of showing my age, I grew up reading stories all of which would be classified today as 'slow reads'. I actually prefer that long build-up of tension instead of the frenetic thrust into conflict and 'attraction' on page one. I like to learn about the characters instead of feeling like I missed the first ten episodes of a new show and have to muddle around, trying to understand motivations and 'character'. I am a huge fan of 'non-traditional' and unconventional.

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    1. Thank you Nya, for visiting my blog and sharing your view. I agree. :)

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  3. It all depends on what you mean by 'slow start'. 'Takes a long while to get to the sexy bits'? Once the first word has been written the story has started. As long as what you are telling the reader is interesting and you engage the reader then it is fine. If what you are saying is interesting and the reader wants to know more then it will be fine. If it reads like a text book then maybe you need to think again. I must confess I haven't looked at your sample so my comments are just general not specific to your story.

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    1. Hello Kristen,

      I meant a longer wait to get to those parts of the story where the hero and heroine are interacting and coming into direct conflict. In Alex's Angel, the hero and heroine are introduced before they meet each other and are shown in their pre-existing conflicts with other people and situations.

      Thank you so much for stopping by to give your opinion. :)

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  4. A slower start can be kind of like literary foreplay, and that's not a bad thing. Some writers might inadvertently have a book with a "slow start" because what they've written is an info dump. They have so much back story in their head about the characters' backgrounds and the minutia of their lives that they just *have to* share. Unfortunately, that kind of slow start is a turn off to most readers.

    What you describe in Alex's Angel (and I've read the book, so this is not an uninformed opinion), is not an info dump; it is character building and integral to the story. You've cleverly made the distinction between foreplay and a nap. :)

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    1. Thank you Patricia for visiting and sharing your opinion. Thank you so much for the kind words about Alex's Angel. I am very honored that you have read it. :)

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  5. I'm a character driving reader and writer. I love it when an author lets the reader get to know the characters in the book.

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    1. Hello Sandy,

      Thank you for stopping by and sharing your thoughts. I agree with you. :) I love character stories myself.

      Delete

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